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History will not remember us fondly: Growth vs Profit

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<20210111232429.k6qihcfkexmu4q3t@rkumarlappie>
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I liked the "History will not remember us fondly" article, but I think 
it's worth being a little more nuanced than (correctly) connecting all 
the mentioned evils to profit.

Lots of companies specifically chase growth, which (as I see it) is not 
exactly the same as what's implied by chasing "profit". There's a 
difference between trying to lower expenses and increase revenue the 
"old-fashioned" way [1], and wooing investors by getting people locked 
into your system/platform and then milking them for all they're worth 
(and then some). The latter is (almost always) a long-term strategy to 
achieve the former, but it's worth highlighting because of how 
unfortunately successful it is and how it basically requires working 
against users.

The "chasing growth" mentality's harmfulness goes beyond business 
models; it's also responsible for software bloat, imperialism...the list 
goes on. Sometimes, having a goal or "ideal state" is better than having 
a general, endless trajectory. Of course, this isn't always the case.

[1]: "old-fashioned" doesn't sound like the right term to describe this 
approach, but seemed better than writing "more basic and simplistic" or 
"the way you were taught in elementary school"

-- 
/Seirdy
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<C8GPUGLR38WL.2FQ8HSCYPWUA8@taiga>
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<20210111232429.k6qihcfkexmu4q3t@rkumarlappie> (view parent)
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I think you're right to shine a light on the growth mindset, but I think
it would have made this article less focused. I intend to address it
more directly in the future.
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