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Re: Your Thoughts on my Rebuttal

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You need to use the To and Cc fields if you want me to properly see your email, but I saw it anyway.

I only called Drew Devault things I think are the truth; I know he knows better than he acted in his
``Hello World'' article, which is why I called him ``purposefully misleading'' there.  Further, I do
make it clear I'm seeking entertainment with all of this, but that doesn't mean I'm without a point.

I'll list three such systems, as this is all I care to, and I'll recommend you look at this article:

  http://verisimilitudes.net/2019-04-15
gopher://verisimilitudes.net/02019-04-15

Firstly, I'll mention the Lisp Machines.  These are systems purpose-built to run Lisp programs, with
Lisp as the entire system language.  Since the entire system is written in a high-level language, an
exception being programs such as microcode, the system is smaller and easier to change.  The systems
were single-user but why shouldn't everyone's laptop and phone run a server operating system, right:

http://www.unlambda.com

Secondly, Multics is a fascinating system which predates UNIX, a ``castrated Multics''.  Multics was
written in PL/I, another high-level language, and it's claimed that a great many system flaws became
impotent in the face of bounds-checking and whatnot in the operating system, where they're caught in
place of creating security flaws; UNIX lacked many things Multics had, and was written with C, which
makes the operating system larger and trivial flaws damning; I don't believe Multics system requests
failed for no reason, unlike UNIX, and they were exposed like normal procedures, so calling them was
simple.  I've not read all of this, but it's fascinating, so read this if only one such link's read:

https://multicians.org

I'm least familiar with the Xerox systems and so won't provide a link for them, but take a glance at
the Xerox Alto and whatnot.  These systems had user-programmable microcode, so you could design your
own language and then make it the language of the machine itself.  Isn't that an incredible thought?

My thinking is tied to my thoughts of ``insidious optimizations'' and whatnot, so take a read of the
articles elsewhere on my website, if you find it suitably compelling.  I've only provided two links,
so I've not met your request, but the Multicians website alone can keep you busy with its resources.